11 things you need to know about the new mandatory car seat for kids law

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There's a new car seat law in the Philippines: Republic Act 11229 or the Child Safety in Motor Vehicles Act. Here are 11 things you need to know about it.

Yesterday, March 12, Malacañan Palace released a copy of Republic Act 11229 or the Child Safety in Motor Vehicles Act. The new mandatory car seat law in the Philippines was signed by President Rodrigo Duterte last February 22.

paggamit ng car seat, car seat law in the Philippines

Car seat law in the Philippines

The new car seat law in the Philippines aims to protect children from vehicle-related accidents, injuries, and deaths. Although it was already signed into law, it has yet to be implemented. The Department of Transportation needs to release the implementing rules and regulations (IRR) within six months. After DoT comes up with the IRR, the law will be enforced one year after its effectivity.

In short, parents still have more than a year to prepare and to familiarize themselves with the new car seat law in the Philippines.

Here's what we know so far:

  1. A child 12 years and below is not allowed to sit in the front passenger seat of a vehicle when the engine is running.
  2. A child can sit in the front passenger seat only if the child meets the minimum height requirement of 150 centimeters or 4’11.” The child is also required to wear a seat belt.
  3. The driver of the vehicle is responsible for making sure that child passengers are secured in a restraint system (car seat) while the engine is running.
  4. A child should not be left alone in a child restraint system or car seat inside any motor vehicle.
  5. The child restraint system (car seat) should be appropriate to the child's age, height, and weight.
  6. A child is not required to be in a child restraint system (car seat) during medical emergencies or if the child has medical conditions that would put the child in more danger if placed in a child restraint system (car seat).
  7. Breaking the car seat law in the Philippines will result to fines: P1,000 for the first offense, P2,000 for the second offense, P5,000 and suspension of license for up to one year for the third offense.
  8. Manufacturers, distributors, and sellers of child restraint systems and car seats should comply with standards set by the United Nations.
  9. The driver of the vehicle should make sure that the child restraint system or car seat in place has the Philippine Standard (PS) mark.
  10. Using a substandard child restraint system or car seat will result to penalties.
  11. Tampering with PS mark or Import Clearance Certificate (ICC) sticker will also be punished with hefty fines—P50,000 up to P100,000 for every tampered car seat.

The Department of Transportation has yet to make a recommendation on how to implement the use of car seats in public utility vehicles (PUVs).

 

Sources: ABS-CBN News, Philippine News Agency

Also read: Isang mahalagang tip tungkol sa paggamit ng car seats!

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